Monthly Archives: February 2011

What can monkeys tell us?

Lesley at Two Whole Cakes brought this article to my attention. In order to study obesity, some scientists are keeping monkeys–rhesus macaques–in individual cages to more easily monitor their food intake and to limit their exercise. These monkeys eat when … Continue reading

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Resistance to new ideas in science: Part 2: Mothers doing anything besides mothering

In Mother Nature, Sarah Blaffer Hrdy talks about how the scientific picture of maternal behavior (human and animal) has become much more complicated in the last couple centuries. I think that this is instructive in looking at how both “conventional … Continue reading

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Resistance to new ideas in science: Part 1: sleep science

Via Mike the Mad Biologist, there’s a mini-paradigm shift in sleep science. Apparently, an unbroken ~8 hours of sleep is NOT the ideal; it’s better to have two four-hour chunks separated by an hour or two. Sleep specialists, along with … Continue reading

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“Forcing Yourself” to Exercise

Here’s a reblog of something I wrote for my LiveJournal a couple months ago. I created a WordPress account instead to 1) have a dedicated FA blog and 2) have a WordPress account, because it seemed like LiveJournal wasn’t really … Continue reading

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You don’t know why I’m taking the elevator today

By way of Obesity Panacea comes this story: A woman was mocked for “lazily” using a Segway scooter to push a stroller. It turns out that she’s a cancer survivor and one of her legs is a prosthetic. It made … Continue reading

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More on suicide and perceived fatness

In my last post I mentioned that fat kids are more likely to commit suicide. Technically, though, what matters is perceived fatness (although there is correlation between the two). The fact that the important factor is perceived fatness rather than … Continue reading

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Beliefs have consequences!

On scienceblogs, Mike the Mad Biologist┬áhas a post up where he argues that certain types of beliefs inevitably lead to bullying and stigma, even if the people originally promoting the beliefs adopt a hate-the-sin-love-the-sinner attitude and are horrified that the … Continue reading

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